Monday, January 10, 2011

Southern Sudanese vote for freedom

I hope they are able to defend themselves and build their new country.

23 comments :

Freedom said...

I think they will have a better life, most of them wanting separation.

Because either living with war or get their own country!

Don Cox said...

They have a long road ahead of them. The country is very poor, and they have the curse of oil.

Anonymous said...

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Anonymous said...

ahahahaha @ "vote for freedom"

Mojo's stupidity is unbelievable. Ridiculous. Mojo, how much do you want to bet there will ALWAYS be some kind of conflict, regardless of some imaginary line.

Freedom? more like freedumb

Anonymous said...

and this has nothing to do with oil?

Maury said...

It has everything to do with oil. South Sudan has all the oil, and North Sudan gets all the revenue. 2 1/2 million Sudanese died over it. It's the same story in Nigeria. The oil is in the Christian south, but the north takes all the revenue. Ditto for Saudi Arabia. The Shia Eastern Province has the oil, and their Wahhabi overlords spend it on yachts and palaces.


Don Cox hit the nail on the head. For third world countries, oil is a curse.

Iraqi Mojo said...

"Mojo, how much do you want to bet there will ALWAYS be some kind of conflict, "

I would not be surprised if the Sudanese 3arab jarab continue to attack the Sudanese Christians. It's why I said "I hope they are able to defend themselves".

Mister Ghost said...

Well,
I hope the western powers will defend the Southern Sudanese Christians, Animists, and secular Muslims (since the oil is there, they and the Chinese should have a strong interest in keeping the region stable), because during one of the previous conflicts, the Egyptian air force attacked the southern Sudanese on behalf of the north.

The history of the area seems to be complex with the intersection of Islam - oil - Sharia - Christianity - Arab Suprematicism - Animism - Marxism - tribalism.

With the oil revenue and a strong military, and with help from the West and the UN, Southern Sudan could become an emerging democracy in Africa.

C.H. said...

I'm hoping for the best here...for once, I actually agree with Mr. Ghost on something. South Sudan, provided another civil war does not erupt, has real potential in becoming an emerging democracy in a region that desperately needs it.

Anonymous said...

Mojo you are completely misinformed.

Have you ever heard of Lords Resistance Army? You are either completely ignorant, plain stupid, misinformed, or delusional.

Also, theres no "Ayyyraaaaaaaaaaab Jayyyyyyyyyrabb" in Many other African countries, and they are successful right? lol

Ayrab Jayrab said...

I have finally chosen a name

C.H. said...

It was not the Lord's Resistance Army that waged war and genocide on the population of South Sudan and produced 2 million corpses, it was the Islamist Regime, headed today by Omar Al-Bashir, and its reign of Sharia Law.

The LRA were too busy abducting children and burning villages deeper in the heart of Africa. Granted, rebel leader Kony has attacked South Sudan on a number of occasions.

Iraqi Mojo said...

Dude it's pronounced 3arub jarub. You don't really believe it's ayrab jayrab, do you? Were you born in Canada? What part of the great wa6an al 3arabi do your parents come from?

Iraqi Mojo said...

I've heard of the LRA, but I didn't know they were involved in the Sudanese conflict. I thought they were just another rebel group that killed innocent people.

I just learned: "The LRA's ideology is disputed amongst academics.[23][25] While most academics and media outlets regard LRA as primarily a Christian militia,[4][5][6][7][8][9][10] the LRA reportedly evokes Acholi nationalism on occasion,[26] but the sincerity of this behavior is considered dubious by some observers.[27][28] During its brief alliance with the Muslim country of Sudan it also claimed to be Islamic as well, an apparent contradiction.[29]"

Iraqi Mojo said...

I always thought the Sudanese civil war was between North Sudan (primarily Sudanese Arab, led by Omar al Bashir) and Southern Sudan (primarily Christian and comprised of different ethnic tribes).

Canadian Ayrab, you act as if it was not Sudanese 3arab jarab (Janjaweed) who mass murdered and raped innocent people in Darfur. Was it the other way around?

Ayrab Jayrab said...

There are deep western hands involved in the civil war.

You don't get 2 million killed without foreign countries arming certain parties.

Also, sudan is deeply tribal. Anyways, no one can deny that the oil has a big part to do with this.

Ayrab Jayrab said...

A US businessman backed by former CIA and state department officials says he has secured a vast tract of fertile land in south Sudan from the family of a notorious warlord, in post-colonial Africa’s biggest private land deal.

Philippe Heilberg, a former Wall Street banker and chairman of New York-based Jarch Capital, told the Financial Times he had gained leasehold rights to 400,000 hectares of land – an area the size of Dubai – by taking a majority stake in a company controlled by the son of Paulino Matip.
EDITOR’S CHOICE
Quest to create a new Sudan bread basket - Jan-09
Map: Africa’s farmland grab - Jan-09

Mr Matip fought on both sides in Sudan’s lengthy civil war but became deputy commander of the army in the autonomous southern region after a 2005 peace agreement.

Ayrab Jayrab said...

The CIA has initiated close contacts with Sudanese intelligence director MG Salah Gosh, who has also been identified in Congress as a war crimes suspect for his exploits in Darfur. In a sign of growing cooperation many Sudanese prisoners at Guantanamo Bay have been released to Sudanese authorities. Besides intelligence sharing, the U.S. is also keen to protect the peace agreement that will end the North-South civil war and release vast new reserves of oil onto the market.[2]

"Sudan's western province is widely viewed in Khartoum as a proxy battle-ground for the continuing struggle by President al-Bashir and the security apparatus against Hassan al-Turabi's Islamist following. Indeed, the terror that has descended on Darfur reveals a shocking cynicism both on the part of the government and the leading opposition party. The atrocities of the government-backed Janjaweed militias have occurred under the cover of negotiations to end the war in South Sudan, which no party (especially the United States after its considerable diplomatic investment) wishes to derail. The growing relationship between the CIA and the Sudanese security chiefs (some of whom were named in Congress as suspects in Darfur war-crimes) has effectively sidelined U.S. influence in Darfur.

Ayrab Jayrab said...

According to the Washington Post, the US government decided, in 1996, to send nearly $20 million of military equipment through the 'front-line' states of Ethiopia, Eritrea and Uganda to help the Sudanese opposition overthrow the Khartoum regime." While this is indicative of Clinton Administration policy, the article did not explicitly mention CIA as part of the operation, and, if this is basically military aid, the Defense and State Departments would normally handle the transactions.[5] "U.S. officials also deny that the equipment is specifically earmarked for the Sudanese rebels, despite the declared anti-Khartoum policies of the recipient governments. "We are assisting these governments in their own defense. Nothing we are giving them is to be used for any other purpose," said George Moose, assistant secretary of state for African affairs."

Maury said...

I'm sure there's a point in there somewhere.

C.H. said...

I'm still looking for it...

C.H. said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Dolly said...

c.h. you have a new cause? Southern Sudan. Any bracelets?

I was considering the ►Just 10◄ bracelet by Dr. Oz

But I'm not as Clooney as you