Saturday, January 29, 2011

"They should all be afraid now"

'Mady used to be a member of the Muslim Brotherhood, until he split to form al-Wasat. He dismissed Western concerns that the Islamist group might use the situation to its advantage and take over the country. "The Muslim Brotherhood is powerful, and they have large numbers, so yes there is a small worry," he says. "But this revolution is not just opening the doors to the Brotherhood, but to all political actors. This will actually lead to a balance in Egyptian society, where power is distributed to all, not just the brotherhood, as the regime has threatened." Mady echoed a refrain common to many politicians opposed to Egypt's president: "The Brotherhood is a scarecrow that the regime sets up to frighten westerners into accepting Mubarak's police state. Once power is evenly distributed, we will see that they don't have that much strength."

As he spoke, a ticker flash on CNN said that Saudi Arabia's King Abdullah had pledged his support to Mubarak. Asked about this, Mady laughed: "All the Arab regimes, they are terrified. They know that if Mubarak falls, they will be next. Tunis gave us a push, but Egypt is the beginning of the end for the Arab world's dictatorial regimes. They should all be afraid now." '


Read more: http://www.time.com/time/world/article/0,8599,2045116,00.html#ixzz1CSNqTR3u

7 comments :

Mister Ghost said...

How soon before this Mady character is running for his life in the post Revolution period? He sounds like one of the dumbo Iranian Communists who sided with the Khomeini boys to drive out the Shah. And then the Khomeini Mob started to slit the throats of the communists and leftists.

Maury said...

I'm worried Mubarak hogged power so long, there may not be capable replacements. Egypt has a Parliament that just rubber stamped legislation for the last 50 years. Ditto for the courts. It's not just a matter of replacing Mubarak. The whole system has to go. We can only cross our fingers and hope Egypt gets something better.

Maury said...

WASHINGTON — Two different White Houses, two different speeches.

In June 2005, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice stood before an audience of 600 at the American University in Cairo, assailed the Egyptian government for intimidating and locking up protesters and called for President Hosni Mubarak to hold free elections. “For 60 years, my country, the United States, pursued stability at the expense of democracy in this region here in the Middle East, and we achieved neither,” said Ms. Rice, infuriating the Mubarak government and heartening opposition leaders like Ayman Nour, an oft-jailed Parliament member, with whom she even held a meeting as part of her trip.

Maury said...

In June 2009, President Obama stood before an audience of 3,000 at Cairo University, and took a far gentler tone. “I do have an unyielding belief that all people yearn for certain things: the ability to speak your mind and have a say in how you are governed, confidence in the rule of law and the equal administration of justice, government that is transparent and doesn’t steal from the people, the freedom to live as you choose,” Mr. Obama said. But he then added, “There is no straight line to realize that promise.” Mr. Mubarak’s officials were euphoric after his speech; one called it “seminal.”

http://tinyurl.com/48bzo78

Maury said...

Chris Mathews is full of poo poo. He says Tunisia and Egypt prove the war in Iraq wasn't needed. As if Sadman would have allowed protests. The difference between Egypt and Iraq is, Sadman wouldn't have used tear gas or rubber bullets. He would have run protesters over with tanks. Then he would have their families locked up, tortured, and killed, as well.

http://tinyurl.com/4b2d684

Maury said...

Chris Mathews is conflicted. He says Egypt proves the war in Iraq wasn't necessary, yet he blames what's happening in Egypt on Bush. I think Chris needs a laxative.

Chris Taus said...

Allowing the Muslim Brotherhoo­d would be a huge and game changing mistake. It is truly chilling to think that Egypt could wind up controlled by a group that has long and deep ties to terrorism, counts known terrorists among its influentia­l members, and has an agenda that embraces and accepts violent Jihad against any who defy Islam as a reasonable and just means to spreading militant Islam. This group has made very clear thier intentions and goals of Sharia as the dominant form of Law and Governance­, and desire to install Islam into dominance over all of the mideast and eventually the world.